Words, Images, Contexts: Making Inferences Explicit

A lot seems to happen when we make inferences. Often so much, that it can be hard to articulate. We read a word, a phrase, a whole sentence, and this collides with our knowledge. Not just our knowledge of words, but our knowledge of the world, our history as readers, as well as any contextual knowledge…

Beautiful language, beautiful analysis?

If students are given more beautiful language to explore, would their analysis itself be more beautiful? One of my biggest priorities this year is preparing my year 11 classes for their exams. Sure, this statement is unlikely to make it into any teacher recruitment literature, but it’s an unavoidable fact of teaching. And to this…

Ignite the Thesaurus! Synonymy in the classroom.

I don’t wish to start off the blog-post by sounding too boastful. But, and I’m sure you’ll be jealous to learn this, I have a full set of thesauruses in my classroom. Yep, that’s right. While most other English classrooms along the corridor struggle along with only a handful of mismatched, different editions, I have maintained…

William Blake and the Connections between Knowledge.

This summer we decided to stay in the UK for our holiday. I’ve always felt a little ashamed of how little of my homeland I’ve actually seen. We stayed in the beautiful lake district, drove to Glasgow for the Commonwealth Games and spent a couple of days soaking up history around Hadrian’s Wall. In Glasgow we…

Crisps, Cereal and the Curriculum

To start, I’m going to indulge myself with a trip down memory lane. I’m in HG3, a particularly cold classroom, we’ve got Mr Gordon for AS English Language, and we’re doing the crisp packet lesson. Over 10 years on and I can still vividly remember the day I dissected the packaging of these pleasingly shaped…